Gathered from the Field; Art Provoked by Climate Research

Detail of WAIS Reliquary and Reliquary Urn

Gathered from the Field; Art Provoked by Climate Research Kittredge Gallery, University of Puget Sound Anna McKee and Suze Woolf create artwork from scientific data on our changing world. The artists use natural sciences evidence to fill their work with meaning, construct beauty, and examine the present. Exhibition March 2020-August 2020, shutdown by COVID-19

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"WAIS Reliquary: 68,000 Years" – Story

In January 2012, after ten years of planning and work, scientists completed drilling a 3405 meters core from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (http://www.waisdivide.unh.edu/). It is one of the deepest and most detailed ice cores ever retrieved. Data from the study of this ice is redefining our understanding of the climate record. In 2009-10, I visited the WAIS…

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WAIS Divide Science Meeting 2010

Last month I attended the annual WAIS Divide Ice Core Project Science Meeting to give a presentation of my artwork. It was a fascinating experience to be in a room full of about 100 of the most distinguished ice core scientists and graduate students in the United States and reassuring to see the rigor, integrity…

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In the Studio-making new etching plates

I have been spending a lot of time in the studio, preparing artwork for an exhibition at Francine Seders Gallery this coming November. This first photo is of an etching plate inked, wiped and ready to print. The blue areas are where the aquatint is holding ink. The copper areas are where there is little…

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Reflections from the Ice

I am home and sorting through notes, sketches and photographs from my travels south. Paul and I had a great time in New Zealand. We hiked in the Queen Charlottes, Abel Tasman,  and on the west coast; drove through wine country that felt like the Napa Valley; saw many strange birds and entire forests of…

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Waiting for a Flight out of McMurdo

Many people here have stories of boomerangs, delays and canceled flights trying to get to or from Antarctica. So I must embrace my situation as a quintessential experience of visiting The Ice. I was originally scheduled to fly out of McMurdo Station for Christchurch, New Zealand on January 5th. This process began the evening before…

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Whether there is Weather

Weather drives everything in the United States Antarctic Program; flights happen or don’t, camps get re-supplied or don’t, work progresses or doesn’t. Even moderate winds in sub-freezing temperatures can make outdoor work difficult or impossible. Of course knowing weather conditions would make planning that much easier. But predicting the weather here is more complicated, and…

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Another Blog about WAIS Divide

McMurdo Station – Happy New Year! I am working on a few blog posts for the new year, so stay tuned. In the meantime, check out the blog of a science graduate student Heidi Roop, who is working at WAIS.  She is sponsored by the Exploratorium in San Francisco and took great video equipment into…

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Farewell to WAIS – Hello IceStock

December 31, 2009 WAIS Divide Camp at 79.47° S latitude, 112.06 W° longitude – high on the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Plateau. I am sending off 2009 with a flight out of WAIS Camp to McMurdo Station. It will seem like the tropics to me since it is above freezing there. Though I am sad…

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Physical properties of Ice, or How to make an ice core sandwich. . .

Thin sections of glacier ice are incredibly beautiful. I love to gaze into these clear windows filled with little bubbles; some spherical, others oblong, all holding ancient air.  The ice refracts light from its crystal faces into multiple planes of shimmering color. I see them as lovely sculptures, but scientists prepare them to study the…

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